Indian Forum for Water Adroit

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Abstract: To promote the advancement of novel observation techniques that may lead to new sources of
information to help better understand the hydrological cycle, the International Association of
Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) established the Measurements and Observations in the XXI century
(MOXXI) Working Group in July 2013. The group comprises a growing community of techenthusiastic
hydrologists that design and develop their own sensing systems, adopt a multidisciplinary
perspective in tackling complex observations, often use low-cost equipment intended
for other applications to build innovative sensors, or perform opportunistic measurements. This
paper states the objectives of the group and reviews major advancements carried out by
MOXXI members toward the advancement of hydrological sciences. Challenges and
opportunities are outlined to provide strategic guidance for advancement of measurement, and
thus discovery.

Link to this article: https://doi.org/10.1080/02626667.2017.1420191
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Please follow the link :http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/01/nearly-100-scientists-spent-2-months-google-docs-redefine-p-value-here-s-what-they-came
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Announcements / Scientist recruitment at NRSC
« Last post by Diwan on January 19, 2018, 03:31:40 PM »
Dear all

FYI

For more details pls find the attached document.

recruitment portal:  http://218.248.0.109:1895/erechomepage/
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Data / New Map of Worldwide Croplands Supports Food and Water Security
« Last post by Pankaj Dey on January 19, 2018, 11:18:47 AM »

India has the highest net cropland area while South Asia and Europe are considered agricultural capitals of the world.A new map was released today detailing croplands worldwide in the highest resolution yet, helping to ensure global food and water security in a sustainable way.
The map establishes that there are 1.87 billion hectares of croplands in the world, which is 15 to 20 percent—or 250 to 350 million hectares (Mha)—higher than former assessments. The change is due to more detailed understanding of large areas that were never mapped before or were inaccurately mapped as non-croplands.
Earlier studies showed either China or the United States as having the highest net cropland area, but this study shows that India ranks first, with 179.8 Mha (9.6 percent of the global net cropland area). Second is the United States with 167.8 Mha (8.9 percent), China with 165.2 Mha (8.8 percent) and Russia with 155.8 Mha (8.3 percent). Statistics of every country in the world can be viewed in an interactive map.
South Asia and Europe can be considered agricultural capitals of the world due to the percentage of croplands of the total geographic area. Croplands make up more than 80 percent of Moldova, San Marino and Hungary; between 70 and 80 percent of Denmark, Ukraine, Ireland and Bangladesh; and 60 to 70 percent of the Netherlands, United Kingdom, Spain, Lithuania, Poland, Gaza Strip, Czech Republic, Italy and India. For comparison, the United States and China each have 18 percent croplands.
The study was led by the USGS and is part of the Global Food Security-Support Analysis Data @ 30-m (GFSAD30) Project. The map is built primarily from Landsat satellite imagery with 30-meter resolution, which is the highest spatial resolution of any global agricultural dataset.


Link to the maps: https://web.croplands.org/app/map?lat=13.28339&lng=75.85098266601564&zoom=10
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Announcements / WMO Fellowship Programme
« Last post by Pankaj Dey on January 18, 2018, 02:53:44 PM »


The aim of the WMO Fellowship Programme is to support the education and training of qualified and suitable candidates, particularly from Least Developed and Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States. Please see the website for general information on WMO Fellowship Programme: https://public.wmo.int/en/resources/training/fellowships




WMO fellowship opportunities related to hydrology and water resources are available for the following institutions: Hohai University (Nanjing, China), Leibniz Universität (Hannover, Germany), UNESCO-IHE, Institute for Water Education (Delft, Netherlands), Russian State Hydrometeorological University (St. Petersburg, Russia), Indian Institute of Technology - Department of Hydrology (Roorkee, India), Universidad Nacional del Litoral (Santa Fe, Argentina).



The deadline for general nomination to WMO is 28 February 2018. Please note that any nomination should be endorsed by the Permanent Representative of the candidate's country of origin with WMO. For detailed information: https://www.wmo.int/edistrib_exped/grp_prs/_en/2017-12-13-DRA-ETR-ID41695_en.pdf
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The year 2015 was special for climate scientists, particularly for the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) research community, as a major El Niño finally materialized after a long pause since the 1997/1998 extreme El Niño. It was scientifically exciting since, due to the short observational record, our knowledge of an extreme El Niño has been based only on the 1982/1983 and 1997/1998 events. The 2015/2016 El Niño was marked by many environmental disasters that are consistent with what is expected for an extreme El Niño. Considering the dramatic impacts of extreme El Niño, and the risk of a potential increase in frequency of ENSO extremes under greenhouse warming, it is timely to evaluate how the recent event fits into our understanding of ENSO extremes. Here we provide a review of ENSO, its nature and dynamics, and through analysis of various observed key variables, we outline the processes that characterize its extremes. The 2015/2016 El Niño brings a useful perspective into the state of understanding of these events and highlights areas for future research. While the 2015/2016 El Niño is characteristically distinct from the 1982/1983 and 1997/1998 events, it still can be considered as the first extreme El Niño of the 21st century. Its extremity can be attributed in part to unusually warm condition in 2014 and to long-term background warming. In effect, this study provides a list of physically meaningful indices that are straightforward to compute for identifying and tracking extreme ENSO events in observations and climate models.


Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017RG000560/epdf
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Post your question/information / Why and How to Write a High-Impact Review Paper
« Last post by Pankaj Dey on January 18, 2018, 02:39:26 PM »
High-impact review papers describe and synthesize the current state of the art, the open questions and controversies, and provide ideas for future investigations. They are written not only for a specific scientific discipline but also for the broader Earth and space science community. They not only summarize the literature, but they also create a framework from which to understand the progress, problems, and connections between different communities, observations, models, and approaches. Here we describe how to write a high-impact review paper, and why you should consider writing one for Reviews of Geophysics.


Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017RG000587/full
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Announcements / Training on VIC Model with NASA Earth Observations
« Last post by Abhishek on January 18, 2018, 01:23:23 AM »
Introduction to VIC Hydrologic Model with NASA Earth Observations.

https://arset.gsfc.nasa.gov/water/webinars/VIC18


Dates: Thursday, February 15, 2018 to Thursday, March 1, 2018
Times: 9:00 – 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 – 7:00 p.m. EST (UTC -5)
Registration Closes: Tuesday, February 13, 2018

"Hydrologic modeling is useful for flood, drought, and water resources management. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) Model uses inputs to better understand hydrological processes in near real-time. Many of the inputs are available from NASA remote sensing and Earth system models, allowing the model to provide soil moisture, evapotranspiration and runoff as outputs. Together with precipitation data, these outputs provide quantitative assessment of a regional water budget. This introductory training will include an overview of the model, sources of satellite-derived input data, and implementation of the model".
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We present TerraClimate, a dataset of high-spatial resolution (1/24°, ~4-km) monthly climate and climatic water balance for global terrestrial surfaces from 1958–2015. TerraClimate uses climatically aided interpolation, combining high-spatial resolution climatological normals from the WorldClim dataset, with coarser resolution time varying (i.e., monthly) data from other sources to produce a monthly dataset of precipitation, maximum and minimum temperature, wind speed, vapor pressure, and solar radiation. TerraClimate additionally produces monthly surface water balance datasets using a water balance model that incorporates reference evapotranspiration, precipitation, temperature, and interpolated plant extractable soil water capacity. These data provide important inputs for ecological and hydrological studies at global scales that require high spatial resolution and time varying climate and climatic water balance data. We validated spatiotemporal aspects of TerraClimate using annual temperature, precipitation, and calculated reference evapotranspiration from station data, as well as annual runoff from streamflow gauges. TerraClimate datasets showed noted improvement in overall mean absolute error and increased spatial realism relative to coarser resolution gridded datasets.


Link to paper: https://www.nature.com/articles/sdata2017191
Link to data: http://doi.org/10.7923/G43J3B0R
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Announcements / NOAA Climate & Global Change Postdoctoral Fellowships
« Last post by Pankaj Dey on January 14, 2018, 04:30:13 PM »
NOAA Climate & Global Change Postdoctoral Fellowships - CALL FOR APPLICATIONS - Deadline: 6 April 2018 - https://t.co/TiPBAbDAz0 https://t.co/DOTNy6E63S
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