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Topics - Sonali

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1
FYI

Dr Reshmi and Dr Sonali 

We take immense pleasure to inform you that the Centre of Excellence in Water Resources Management, Department of Civil Engineering, BITS Pilani, Hyderabad Campus is organizing a Workshop on “Fuzzy Logic and Applications in Civil Engineering” during March 15-16, 2019.

Topics that will be covered are: Understanding difference between crisp and fuzzy logic, shapes of membership functions, Basics of Crisp and Fuzzy relations, Fuzzification and defuzzification, Fuzzy logic and reasoning, Fuzzy Logic based Decision Making, Fuzzy Data Mining Approaches, Optimization and Fuzzy based Optimization, Case Studies in Civil Engineering

Registration fee for the workshop is Rs. 2000/-.. Participants are requested to send the payment through demand draft in favour of “Birla Institute of Technology and Science Pilani, Hyderabad Campus” payable at State Bank of India (Code 21092). Alternatively, money can be sent through online bank transfer. Details for online payment of registration fees is IFSC Code SBIN0021092, Account number 62013596336. Participants are requested to register via the following link: https://goo.gl/CXpuVR

Co-Ordinators for the workshop: Prof K.Srinivasa Raju and Prof A.Vasan.

The poster is attached for your reference.

It is requested to circulate the information to faculty, research scholars, PG students of Department and known institutions.   

With regards

Srinivasa Raju

--

_______________________________________________

Dr.  Komaragiri Srinivasa Raju, Ph.D.


Professor, Department of Civil Engineering

Birla Institute of Technology and Science Pilani, Hyderabad Campus

Jawahar Nagar, Kapra Mandal

Medchal District 500 078; Telangana, India

Tel: 91-40-6630 3519 (O)

Email: ksraju@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in

Homepage: http://universe.bits-pilani.ac.in/hyderabad/ksraju/Profile




2
 FYI

https://www.waterfutureconference.org
https://www.waterfutureconference.org/abstract_submission
https://www.waterfutureconference.org/theme#1


The Abstract submission period ends on February 28th, 2019

Towards a Sustainable Water Future
24 - 27th September 2019 Bengaluru, India
Sheraton Grand Bangalore Hotel at Brigade Gateway 26/1 Dr. Rajkumar Road, Malleswaram-Rajajinagar Bengaluru 560 055, India

Please find the attached flyer on 'call for abstract' as well as the conference website and contact details.

https://www.waterfutureconference.org
conferencebng@water-future.org

We request you to share the conference information and the flyer with your network and encourage them to submit abstracts. Please let me know if you think we should make any changes to the website, topic lists or the thematic scope. Looking forward to speaking to you all soon.

3
FYI

DEAR ALL,


        CENTER FOR ATMOSPHERIC AND OCEANIC SCIENCES
                                       SEMINAR

TITLE: "Attributing observed changes in surface air temperature and rainfall over India"

SPEAKER: KRISHNA ACHUTARAO, CENTER FOR ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, IIT DELHI

TIME AND DATE: 3:30 PM, MONDAY, 4 FEBRUARY 2019

VENUE: CAOS SEMINAR HALL

ABSTRACT

Observed trends in temperature and rainfall over India are analyzed from a detection and attribution (D&A) perspective. Increasing temperatures over India since the middle of the 20th Century over various homogeneous zones of India were analyzed in a recent study by Dileep kumar et al., (2018) who concluded that observed increases can be attributed to forcings from greenhouse gases that have been offset by other anthropogenic factors (including anthropogenic aerosols and land use land cover change). However, the linear regression based D&A method cannot disaggregate the role of anthropogenic aerosols alone since the response to different forcings is not always linearly additive.

4

https://www.downtoearth.org.in/news/science-technology/did-you-know-indian-and-west-african-monsoons-are-linked--63043

Did you know Indian and West African monsoons are linked?
A report by an IISc scientist says that El Nino oscillates between both regions and affects the intensity of their rainfall



We all knew that monsoon in both India and West Africa is intimately linked to the regions’ agriculture economies, which is mostly either rain fed or irrigated by rivers that too depend on rains to maintain flow. But now scientists have found that rains in these regions might also be linked to each other through the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon which affects both of them. 

A recent research paper published in the journal Climate Dynamics says ENSO’s relationship with Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) has shifted towards the West African Summer Monsoon (WASM). For example, between 1911 and 1930 while the influence of ENSO on ISM was weak, the influence of ENSO on WASM was strong. It also says that this shift is part of a multi decadal cycle, which weakens ENSO’s relationship with ISM while strengthening its relationship with the WASM and vice versa.

And, between 1931 and 1980 these influences reversed in character. Then they flipped again between 1981 and 2015. The reason behind this see-saw relationship is a shift in one half of ENSO’s temperature gradient (cooling part) from the north west of the Indian Monsoon region to the northern part of West Africa.

But there is a catch. Current models do not agree and correctly predict that if this is going to shift again or how much time it will take to do so in a world reeling under climate change. The physics of Earth’s climate, especially regarding a large-scale phenomenon like El Nino, is too complicated to be simulated by computational models even ones that are currently using artificial intelligence. But, this might improve with better dynamic climate models which are closer to how clouds and turbulence actually behave in our atmosphere.

The warm phase of the ENSO or the El Nino refers to the unusual warming of the central and east-central equatorial Pacific Ocean which affects global weather including India and West Africa. The other half of this oscillation is formed by the cooling of the north western Indian monsoon region or the northern part of West Africa.

During El Nino, the warmer waters of the Pacific Ocean cause the winds in various regions, like the trade winds that come towards India, to reverse. This change of wind direction can lead to warmer winters and summers and a decrease in rainfall during the monsoon. Sometimes it also leads to drought.

In the cooling phase of the ENSO, known as the La Nina, the exact opposite of these events happen which might lead to increased rainfall inducing floods, flash floods and landslides.

In fact, the paper states, “During 1901-2015, the ISM recorded 22 droughts, of which nine were associated with El Niño and of the 18 floods recorded in that period, nine were associated with La Niña. On the other hand, for WASM, out of 21 droughts, nine were associated with El Niño, while of the 22 floods, seven were caused by La Niña, implying that 45 per cent of the ISM and 39 per cent of the WASM rainfall extremes are associated with ENSO.”....
.........................
........

5
FYI

Dear Colleagues,


You are cordially invited to submit an abstract to our AOGS 2019, 16th Annual Meeting (28th July to 2nd August 2019 in Singapore) session on

"impacts and Consequences of Changing Climate and Landuse on Hydrology"  [HS16]

 Session Details (HS16): http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2019/public.asp?page=sessionList.htm

The goal of this session is to contribute to the discussions on the consequences of climate change and its impact on  hydrological  extremes. In this session, studies addressing but not limited to the following questions are welcome:

-What advances have we made in study related to Impact of changing climate and land use on hydrology?

-what are the bottlenecks that hinder decision makeing taking decisions based on Impact of changing climate and land use on hydrology studies?.

-Case studies of local to regional scale about Impact of changing climate and land use on Hydrology

- what are the current and future challenges in handling of climate change and land use change data and their uncertainty for the forcing of hydrological models?

-what advances have we made in dealing with uncertainty associated in study of Impact of changing climate and land use on hydrology and how useful are they to decision makers?

Please feel free to forward this invitation to anyone who might be interested in this session.

Last date of Abstract Submission is 12th February 2019.

Warm Regards,

Convenors


http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2019/public.asp?page=funding.htm

6
Dear Colleagues,


You are cordially invited to submit an abstract to our AOGS 2019, 16th Annual Meeting (28th July to 2nd August 2019 in Singapore) session on

" Hydrologic Extremes in a Changing Climate" 


 Session Details (HS10): http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2019/public.asp?page=sessionList.htm

The goal of this session is to contribute to the discussions on the consequences of climate change and its impact on  hydrological  extremes. In this session, studies addressing but not limited to the following questions are welcome:

i. Surface and Ground water management under climate change


ii. Variations in extreme hydrological events and possible attributing factors


iii. Present methodologies adopted, limitations and advances


iv. Stationarity/ Non-stationarity factors


v. Case studies on climate change impact assessment at local/ basin/ regional scales


vi. Flood and Drought analyses


vii. Streamflow assessment and Reservoir operation


viii. Future climate and hydrology


ix. Change in spatio-temporal pattern of precipitation


x. Adaptation and Mitigation strategies


xi. Policy making


xii. Remote sensing applications

Please feel free to forward this invitation to anyone who might be interested in this session.

Last date of Abstract Submission is 12th February 2019.


Warm Regards,

Convenors
image.png

http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2019/public.asp?page=funding.htm

7
FYI


Seminar:

Title: Towards a realistic simulation of boreal summer tropical rainfall climatology in state-of-the-art coupled models

Speaker: Pascal Terray
Laboratoire d'Océanographie et du Climat: Experimentation et approches numériques
Institut Pierre Simon Laplace
Université Pierre & Marie Curie
Paris, France

Date/Time: 3:30 PM, Thursday, 15 November 2018.

Venue: CAOS Seminar Hall

Abstract:
State-of-the-art global coupled models used in seasonal prediction systems and climate projections still have important deficiencies in representing the boreal summer tropical rainfall climatology. These errors include prominently a severe dry bias over all the Northern Hemisphere monsoon regions, excessive rainfall over the ocean and an unrealistic double Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) structure in the tropical Pacific. While these systematic errors can be partly reduced by increasing the horizontal atmospheric resolution of the models, they also illustrate our incomplete understanding of the key mechanisms controlling the position of the ITCZ during boreal summer.
Using a large collection of coupled models and dedicated coupled experiments, we show that these tropical rainfall errors are partly associated with insufficient surface thermal forcing and incorrect representation of the surface albedo over the Northern Hemisphere continents. Improving the parameterization of the land albedo in two global coupled models leads to a large reduction of these systematic errors and further demonstrates that the Northern Hemisphere subtropical deserts play a seminal role in these improvements through a heat low mechanism.



ALL ARE WELCOME


8
Announcements / Jeremy Grantham Lecture on Climate Change
« on: November 08, 2018, 10:40:43 AM »
FYI

Prof. David Battisi, University of Washington, Seattle,USA will deliver the 14th Jeremy Grantham lecture on

Why is there an ocean overturning circulation in the North Atlantic and not in the North Pacific?
8 Nov  (Thursday) CAOS seminar hall 3.30 pm Tea at 3.15 pm


"Climate Change and Global Food Production"
on Friday 9th Nov at 3.30 pm in Divecha auditorium.



9
FYI

Dear Sir/Madam,

As part of the SMART training and outreach activities of Space Applications Centre (SAC), ISRO, Ahmedabad,  four days training programme on ‘Satellite based Sounding of the Atmosphere: Techniques and Applications’ is planned during 27-30 November 2018 at SAC, Ahmedabad.

I hereby enclose the details of this training programme and the application form. Request you to forward the details to interested scientists/students working in your organisation.
 
Thanking you,

Warm regards,

V. Sathiyamoorthy
------------------------------------------
Dr. V. Sathiyamoorthy
Scientist-SG & Head
MRTD/MRG/EPSA
Space Applications Centre, Bopal Campus
Indian Space Research Organisation
BOPAL, Ahmedabad -380058
Email:sathya@sac.isro.gov.in
Phone: 079-26916112


Fax: 079-26916127

11
Announcements / Invited Talk DCCC, IISc
« on: September 17, 2018, 01:14:40 PM »
FYI

Dear All,

Divecha Centre for Climate Change

Indian Institute of Science

---------------------------------------

Guest Lecture

---------------------------------------

 

Speaker                      : Dr. Indra Sekhar Sen

                                        Assistant Professor

Department of Earth Sciences
Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur

 

Title                             : Stable Water Isotope Modeling of Glacier Meltwater in Headwaters of the Hindu   Kush Himalayan Rivers: Variability in Space, Time and Possible Causes

 

Date & Time               : 19th September 2018 (Wednesday) & at 11.00 AM

 

Venue                         : Conference room (No. D305), Divecha Centre for Climate Change

 

Host                            : Dr. Anil V Kulkarni

 

Coffee/ Tea                 : at 10.45 AM

 

 

****All are cordially invited***

 

Abstract                      Himalayan headwater rivers are primarily sourced from glacier meltwater and from Indian summer monsoon (ISM) precipitation, both of which will be strongly influenced by ongoing and future climate change. Hydrologic modeling studies suggest that the glacier meltwater contribution is highest during the warm, dry pre-ISM months (April – June), but this hypothesis is currently hindered by a lack of observational data. To provide new spatial and temporal constraints on end-member contributions in Himalayan streams, we measured electrical conductivity and stable water isotopes (δ18O and δD) in nested catchments throughout the Upper Ganges Basin across three seasons (pre-ISM, ISM, post-ISM) over three years (2014 – 2016). For all time points, we observed a sharp depletion in δ18O and δD moving toward higher elevations, coincident with precipitation isotope trends. Using a site- and season-specific isotope mixing approach, our analyses further revealed large seasonal variability in end-member contributions throughout the basin. Surprisingly, glacier meltwater contributions were highest during the ISM (July – September) and post-ISM (October – December) seasons, contrary to previous model predictions. In addition to protracted storage of glacier meltwater in groundwater aquifers, this result supports "rain-induced" glacier melting during the ISM, which we show can produce 3 – 11 % of total discharge at the glacier snout. In conclusion, glacier meltwater contributions to Himalayan streams exhibit complex seasonal dynamics; this interpretation should be considered when predicting hydrologic responses to climate change in this region.

 

For more details          : anilkulkarni@iisc.ac.in or aryar@iisc.ac.in


Regards,

Arya A.R

Divecha Centre for climate Change

Indian Institute of science

Bengaluru

12
https://www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/22/4593/2018/hess-22-4593-2018.pdf


Abstract



Gap-filling streamflow data is a critical step for most hydrological studies, such as streamflow trend, flood, and drought analysis and hydrological response variable estimates and predictions. However, there is a lack of quantitative evaluation of the gap-filled data accuracy in most hydrological studies. Here we show that when the missing data rate is less than 10 %, the gap-filled streamflow data obtained using calibrated hydrological models perform almost the same as the benchmark data (less than 1 % missing) when estimating annual trends for 217 unregulated catchments widely spread across Australia. Furthermore, the relative streamflow trend bias caused by the gap filling is not very large in very dry catchments where the hydrological model calibration is normally poor. Our results clearly demonstrate that the gap filling using hydrological modelling has little impact on the estimation of annual streamflow and its trends.


13
Announcements / [Seminars] CAOS: 3:30 pm Tuesday 21 August 2018
« on: August 20, 2018, 12:22:45 PM »
FYI

CAOS seminars:


Tuesday Aug. 21 - Studies on improving quantitative precipitation forecasting

Speaker: M K Yau, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

Time: 3:30 pm

Venue: CAOS Seminar Hall

Speaker's Bio:

M. K. (Peter) Yau received his B.Sc., M. Sc., and Ph.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He then joined the Department of Atmospheric
and Oceanic Sciences at McGill University and is a full professor and the senior NSERC/Hydro-Quebec Industrial Research
Chair. He has made contributions in understanding detailed cloud processes, hurricanes, convection and cyclones, and the physics of precipitation. He was
the recipient of the President’s Prize of the Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society (CMOS) and was elected a
CMOS Fellow. He is the co-author of a popular textbook “A Short Course in Cloud Physics, 3rd Edition”.


Coffee/Tea: 3:20pm

All are welcome

14
FYI


CAOS seminar:


Title: Recent studies on tropical cyclones

Speaker: M K Yau, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

Date and Time: Monday Aug 20, 3:30 pm

Venue: CAOS Seminar Hall

Speaker's Bio:

M. K. (Peter) Yau received his B.Sc., M. Sc., and Ph.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He then joined the Department of
Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at McGill University and is a full professor and the senior NSERC/Hydro-Quebec Industrial Research
Chair. He has made contributions in understanding detailed cloud processes, hurricanes, convection and cyclones, and the physics of precipitation. He
was the recipient of the President’s Prize of the Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society (CMOS) and was elected a
CMOS Fellow. He is the co-author of a popular textbook “A Short Course in Cloud Physics, 3rd Edition”.

Coffee/Tea: 3:20pm

All are welcome

15
Announcements / Panel discussion on climate imperatives
« on: August 06, 2018, 08:57:25 AM »
Interesting.

FYI

https://www.livemint.com/Politics/Uq6sBhEUtceBQzIyxxGa8J/Some-stresses-on-biodiversity-being-downplayed.html

Bengaluru: The panel discussion on climate imperatives, moderated by Mint’s energy editor Utpal Bhaskar, included J. Srinivasan, distinguished scientist, Divecha Centre for Climate Change; Jagdish Krishnaswamy, senior fellow, Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment; Aromar Revi, director, Indian Institute for Human Settlements; and Ulka Kelkar, senior climate policy lead, World Resources Institute India. Edited excerpts:

What are your views on the conundrum between environmental issues and growth?

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