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Messages - Sonali

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1
FYI

Dear students,

The Tata Trusts has made a generous contribution to support the travel of
several IISc PhD students to international conferences between Mar 2019 -
Feb 2020. 

We invite PhD students to apply for this grant by filling the form at the
pagehere: https://www.alumni.iisc.ac.in/page/application-for-tata-trusts-travel
-grant-for-students-2019-20

Prerequisites for application:
Should be pursuing a PhD programme at IISc
Should have completed comprehensive examination
Should have an accepted publication at an international conference/symposium
and furnish evidence of the same

Required documents:
Proof/confirmation of conference publication acceptance
Recommendation letter from PhD Advisor
Copies of grade sheets

Applications will be evaluated periodically (during Apr 2019 - Feb 2020) by
the committee of Divisional Chairs and grants will be disbursed on a rolling
basis, based on the availability of funds. Each selected student can avail
up to Rs. 2 lakhs.

Kindly note that once you receive the grant, any
publications/studies/banners/posters supported by the grant must include the
statement "Supported by the Tata Trusts" wherever applicable. Due
acknowledgement needs to be given to the Tata Trusts on any
research/publishable material.

As the funds are provided through a private contribution, there is no
restriction on using only Air India for travel. Private airlines may also be
used for the international travel.   

For any queries, please write to development.odaa@iisc.ac.in.

Thank you.

Sincerely,
Office of Development and Alumni Affairs
Indian Institute of Science

2
Quantifying the shifts and intensification in the annual cycles of diurnal temperature extremes for human comfort and crop production

Work is carried out by
Vinnarasi Rajendran and Prof. Dhanya C T  from IIT Delhi

https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/ab0fe5


Abstract

Any significant change in climate is known to have a significant impact on crop production and human resources, which are generally difficult to quantify. In the present study, two indices are defined: (i) refined growing season (GS) characteristics and (ii) transition period, based on the annual cycles of diurnal temperature extremes, to unravel any possible impact on these productive elements. Multi-dimensional Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition, a non-linear, non-stationary approach is used to extract the annual cycles of diurnal temperature extremes. Since the adverse impact is reportedly more critical over tropical regions, the Indian region is chosen as the study area, and 1°×1° gridded daily minimum and daily maximum temperature data are used. Results reveal earlier onset and lengthening of GS, with notable spatial variations. Further, a drastic reduction in the transition (i.e., comfortable) period is observed over the warm humid regions, majorly due to the encroachment by summer days. On the contrary, over semi-arid regions, the transition period is found to be increasing, majorly due to the shortening of winter. The quantification of these changes may aid in implementing regional adaptation strategies related to the two productive elements.

3
FYI

CAOS Seminar

Title: Local onset and demise of the Indian summer monsoon and its relation to intraseasonal oscillations

Speaker: Prof V. Misra, Dept. of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Florida State University

Date/Time: Wednesday, 20 March 2019, 4:00 PM

Venue: CAOS Seminar Hall


Abstract:
This talk will introduce a relatively new definition for defining the onset and demise of the
Indian summer monsoon (ISM) at a very granular scale that is in fact data adaptive. The
consistency of this local definition with the seasonal changes of the large-scale circulation will
also be discussed. The talk will then show its relationship with the intraseasonal oscillations of
the ISM both from observations and model simulations. Finally, a real time application of
monitoring the onset isochrones with GPM data will be demonstrated.


All Are Welcome.

4
FYI


https://jobs.carnegiescience.edu/jobs/postdoctoral-opportunity-climate-consequences-of-regional-climate-forcing/


Job: Postdoctoral Opportunity: Climate consequences of regional climate forcing

Department: DGE – Global Ecology

Salary: TBD Competitive Salary

Location: Stanford, CA

We seek to help develop a more general understanding of climate consequences of regional changes in climate forcing, both to contribute to fundamental climate science and to better inform decision making. We have done several studies showing that the same changes made in different places can have substantially different climate effects. For example, deforestation effects differ with latitude (Bala et al., PNAS, 2007), ocean heat flux effects vary with ocean basin (Praetorius et al., Nature Comm., 2018), and aerosol effects vary (by up to an order of magnitude!) with country of emission (Persad et al., Nature Comm., 2018). It is likely that attempts at regional-scale geoengineering would have global scale effects that would differ based on where and how that geoengineering occurred. Further, the spatial and temporal pattern of increased precipitation would vary with the location and timing of increased evaporation – as would the balance of lapse-rate vs cloud vs greenhouse-gas aspects of increased evaporation.  Are there general theories that would allow the basic response of the climate system to different regional forcings to be predicted without running a climate model?

We are looking to hire one (or possibly two) postdoctoral research scientists who would undertake geophysical modeling to investigate issues raised by the comments above. The model used could be anything from a high-resolution local model to a coarse-resolution global model, depending on the problem being addressed, although we have been using primarily NCAR’s CESM for this sort of investigation.

This position will involve working with Ken Caldeira at the Carnegie Institution for Science Department of Global Ecology on the Stanford University campus, and other collaborators. In our group, we maintain an exciting collegial atmosphere, working in a diverse collection of people that includes climate modelers, energy-system analysts, assessment experts, and field researchers. It is assumed that the successful candidate will drive work in this broad area as their main research project, but will both rely on and contribute to collaborative relationships with other postdocs in our group, as well as external collaborators. We prefer candidates who will enrich the intellectual diversity of the research group and are actively interested in strengthening interdisciplinary connections within the focal areas of the research group.

Carnegie Institution post-docs have access to most Stanford facilities. The initial term will be for one year with the potential for renewal for a second year up to a maximum of four years. Positions are available now and we are flexible regarding start date.  In there is a particularly strong candidate pool, more than one position could be offered under this posting.

Candidates with a PhD and a track record of success are encouraged to apply. General skills and ability, and interest in understanding the feasibility and consequences of various ocean engineering proposals, are more important than specific domain knowledge. Achievement in scientific publication, or comparable evidence of being able to complete high quality work in a timely manner, is a primary filter determining which applications receive greater consideration. Compensation for this position includes a competitive salary and comprehensive benefits.

Informal inquiries about these positions can be made by emailing Ken Caldeira at kcaldeira@carnegiescience.edu  however formal applications for employment must be submitted by clicking on the blue bar below.

To be considered, please include a cover letter and CV.

Additional information:

The Department of Global Ecology of the Carnegie Institution is located on the campus of Stanford University. Formerly known as the Carnegie Institution of Washington, the Carnegie Institution for Science is a U.S.-based non-profit, private endowment. Andrew Carnegie founded the Carnegie Institution of Washington in 1902 as an organization for scientific discovery to serve as a home to exceptional individuals—men and women—with imagination and extraordinary dedication capable of working at the cutting edge of their fields. Today, Carnegie scientists work in six scientific departments on the west and east Coasts and at the Las Camapanas Observatory in Chile. Carnegie investigators are leaders in the fields of plant biology, developmental biology, earth and planetary sciences, astronomy, and global ecology. To learn more about the Department of Global Ecology, visit https://dge.carnegiescience.edu/

Carnegie is an equal opportunity employer.  All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, religion, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, veteran status, disability or any other protected status in accordance with applicable laws.

Apply Now

5
FYI

https://jobs.carnegiescience.edu/jobs/postdoctoral-opportunity-geophysical-modeling-of-ocean-engineering-proposals/


Job: Postdoctoral Opportunity: Geophysical modeling of ocean engineering proposals

Department: DGE – Global Ecology

Salary: TBD Competitive Salary

Location: Stanford, CA

There have been various proposals to generate electricity by exploiting the temperature difference between the ocean thermocline and the ocean surface (e.g., Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, or OTEC). Further, there have been suggestions that global warming could be slowed by pumping heat from the surface ocean to the deeper ocean, or that thermal and/or chemical conditions suitable for coral reefs could be maintained through some ocean engineering efforts. It has also been suggested that ocean dead zones could be addressed by pumping oxygen-rich surface waters to anoxic regions at depth.

We are looking to hire a postdoctoral research scientist who would undertake geophysical modeling to address some of the issues raised by these proposals. We have done some initial highly-idealized modeling at unrealistic scale (e.g., Kwiatkowski, Ricke and Caldeira, 2015), and would like to understand whether those results apply to deployments at more plausible scale.  The model used could be anything from a high-resolution local model to a coarse-resolution global model, depending on the problem being addressed.

This position will involve working with Ken Caldeira at the Carnegie Institution for Science Department of Global Ecology on the Stanford University campus, and other collaborators. In our group, we maintain an exciting collegial atmosphere, working in a diverse collection of people that includes climate modelers, energy-system analysts, assessment experts, and field researchers. It is assumed that the successful candidate will drive this effort as their main research project but will collaborate with other postdocs both on this work and on their work. We prefer candidates who will enrich the intellectual diversity of the research group and are actively interested in strengthening interdisciplinary connections within the focal areas of the research group.

Carnegie Institution post-docs have access to most Stanford facilities. The initial term will be for one year with the potential for renewal for a second year up to a maximum of four years. Positions are available now and we are flexible regarding start date.

Candidates with a PhD and a track record of success are encouraged to apply. General skills and ability, and interest in understanding the feasibility and consequences of various ocean engineering proposals, are more important than specific domain knowledge. Achievement in scientific publication, or comparable evidence of being able to complete high quality work in a timely manner, is a primary filter determining which applications receive greater consideration. Compensation for this position includes a competitive salary and comprehensive benefits.

Informal inquiries about these positions can be made by emailing Ken Caldeira at kcaldeira@carnegiescience.edu, however formal applications for employment must be submitted by clicking on the blue bar below.

To be considered, please include a cover letter and CV.

Additional information:

The Department of Global Ecology of the Carnegie Institution is located on the campus of Stanford University. Formerly known as the Carnegie Institution of Washington, the Carnegie Institution for Science is a U.S.-based non-profit, private endowment. Andrew Carnegie founded the Carnegie Institution of Washington in 1902 as an organization for scientific discovery to serve as a home to exceptional individuals—men and women—with imagination and extraordinary dedication capable of working at the cutting edge of their fields. Today, Carnegie scientists work in six scientific departments on the west and east Coasts and at the Las Camapanas Observatory in Chile. Carnegie investigators are leaders in the fields of plant biology, developmental biology, earth and planetary sciences, astronomy, and global ecology. To learn more about the Department of Global Ecology, visit https://dge.carnegiescience.edu/

Carnegie is an equal opportunity employer.  All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, religion, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, veteran status, disability or any other protected status in accordance with applicable laws.

Apply Now



6
Announcements / Three 40th anniversaries
« on: February 27, 2019, 12:31:44 PM »
FYI

There is an interesting commentary in Nature Climate Change on the 40th Anniversary of the Charney report, a seminal paper on the detection of climate change and satellite-based climate observations. Nicely written.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-019-0424-x

"Celebrating the anniversary of three key events in climate change science | Nature Climate Change"

7
FYI

Dr Reshmi and Dr Sonali 

We take immense pleasure to inform you that the Centre of Excellence in Water Resources Management, Department of Civil Engineering, BITS Pilani, Hyderabad Campus is organizing a Workshop on “Fuzzy Logic and Applications in Civil Engineering” during March 15-16, 2019.

Topics that will be covered are: Understanding difference between crisp and fuzzy logic, shapes of membership functions, Basics of Crisp and Fuzzy relations, Fuzzification and defuzzification, Fuzzy logic and reasoning, Fuzzy Logic based Decision Making, Fuzzy Data Mining Approaches, Optimization and Fuzzy based Optimization, Case Studies in Civil Engineering

Registration fee for the workshop is Rs. 2000/-.. Participants are requested to send the payment through demand draft in favour of “Birla Institute of Technology and Science Pilani, Hyderabad Campus” payable at State Bank of India (Code 21092). Alternatively, money can be sent through online bank transfer. Details for online payment of registration fees is IFSC Code SBIN0021092, Account number 62013596336. Participants are requested to register via the following link: https://goo.gl/CXpuVR

Co-Ordinators for the workshop: Prof K.Srinivasa Raju and Prof A.Vasan.

The poster is attached for your reference.

It is requested to circulate the information to faculty, research scholars, PG students of Department and known institutions.   

With regards

Srinivasa Raju

--

_______________________________________________

Dr.  Komaragiri Srinivasa Raju, Ph.D.


Professor, Department of Civil Engineering

Birla Institute of Technology and Science Pilani, Hyderabad Campus

Jawahar Nagar, Kapra Mandal

Medchal District 500 078; Telangana, India

Tel: 91-40-6630 3519 (O)

Email: ksraju@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in

Homepage: http://universe.bits-pilani.ac.in/hyderabad/ksraju/Profile




8
 FYI

https://www.waterfutureconference.org
https://www.waterfutureconference.org/abstract_submission
https://www.waterfutureconference.org/theme#1


The Abstract submission period ends on February 28th, 2019

Towards a Sustainable Water Future
24 - 27th September 2019 Bengaluru, India
Sheraton Grand Bangalore Hotel at Brigade Gateway 26/1 Dr. Rajkumar Road, Malleswaram-Rajajinagar Bengaluru 560 055, India

Please find the attached flyer on 'call for abstract' as well as the conference website and contact details.

https://www.waterfutureconference.org
conferencebng@water-future.org

We request you to share the conference information and the flyer with your network and encourage them to submit abstracts. Please let me know if you think we should make any changes to the website, topic lists or the thematic scope. Looking forward to speaking to you all soon.

9
FYI

DEAR ALL,


        CENTER FOR ATMOSPHERIC AND OCEANIC SCIENCES
                                       SEMINAR

TITLE: "Attributing observed changes in surface air temperature and rainfall over India"

SPEAKER: KRISHNA ACHUTARAO, CENTER FOR ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, IIT DELHI

TIME AND DATE: 3:30 PM, MONDAY, 4 FEBRUARY 2019

VENUE: CAOS SEMINAR HALL

ABSTRACT

Observed trends in temperature and rainfall over India are analyzed from a detection and attribution (D&A) perspective. Increasing temperatures over India since the middle of the 20th Century over various homogeneous zones of India were analyzed in a recent study by Dileep kumar et al., (2018) who concluded that observed increases can be attributed to forcings from greenhouse gases that have been offset by other anthropogenic factors (including anthropogenic aerosols and land use land cover change). However, the linear regression based D&A method cannot disaggregate the role of anthropogenic aerosols alone since the response to different forcings is not always linearly additive.

10

https://www.downtoearth.org.in/news/science-technology/did-you-know-indian-and-west-african-monsoons-are-linked--63043

Did you know Indian and West African monsoons are linked?
A report by an IISc scientist says that El Nino oscillates between both regions and affects the intensity of their rainfall



We all knew that monsoon in both India and West Africa is intimately linked to the regions’ agriculture economies, which is mostly either rain fed or irrigated by rivers that too depend on rains to maintain flow. But now scientists have found that rains in these regions might also be linked to each other through the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon which affects both of them. 

A recent research paper published in the journal Climate Dynamics says ENSO’s relationship with Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) has shifted towards the West African Summer Monsoon (WASM). For example, between 1911 and 1930 while the influence of ENSO on ISM was weak, the influence of ENSO on WASM was strong. It also says that this shift is part of a multi decadal cycle, which weakens ENSO’s relationship with ISM while strengthening its relationship with the WASM and vice versa.

And, between 1931 and 1980 these influences reversed in character. Then they flipped again between 1981 and 2015. The reason behind this see-saw relationship is a shift in one half of ENSO’s temperature gradient (cooling part) from the north west of the Indian Monsoon region to the northern part of West Africa.

But there is a catch. Current models do not agree and correctly predict that if this is going to shift again or how much time it will take to do so in a world reeling under climate change. The physics of Earth’s climate, especially regarding a large-scale phenomenon like El Nino, is too complicated to be simulated by computational models even ones that are currently using artificial intelligence. But, this might improve with better dynamic climate models which are closer to how clouds and turbulence actually behave in our atmosphere.

The warm phase of the ENSO or the El Nino refers to the unusual warming of the central and east-central equatorial Pacific Ocean which affects global weather including India and West Africa. The other half of this oscillation is formed by the cooling of the north western Indian monsoon region or the northern part of West Africa.

During El Nino, the warmer waters of the Pacific Ocean cause the winds in various regions, like the trade winds that come towards India, to reverse. This change of wind direction can lead to warmer winters and summers and a decrease in rainfall during the monsoon. Sometimes it also leads to drought.

In the cooling phase of the ENSO, known as the La Nina, the exact opposite of these events happen which might lead to increased rainfall inducing floods, flash floods and landslides.

In fact, the paper states, “During 1901-2015, the ISM recorded 22 droughts, of which nine were associated with El Niño and of the 18 floods recorded in that period, nine were associated with La Niña. On the other hand, for WASM, out of 21 droughts, nine were associated with El Niño, while of the 22 floods, seven were caused by La Niña, implying that 45 per cent of the ISM and 39 per cent of the WASM rainfall extremes are associated with ENSO.”....
.........................
........

11
FYI

Dear Colleagues,


You are cordially invited to submit an abstract to our AOGS 2019, 16th Annual Meeting (28th July to 2nd August 2019 in Singapore) session on

"impacts and Consequences of Changing Climate and Landuse on Hydrology"  [HS16]

 Session Details (HS16): http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2019/public.asp?page=sessionList.htm

The goal of this session is to contribute to the discussions on the consequences of climate change and its impact on  hydrological  extremes. In this session, studies addressing but not limited to the following questions are welcome:

-What advances have we made in study related to Impact of changing climate and land use on hydrology?

-what are the bottlenecks that hinder decision makeing taking decisions based on Impact of changing climate and land use on hydrology studies?.

-Case studies of local to regional scale about Impact of changing climate and land use on Hydrology

- what are the current and future challenges in handling of climate change and land use change data and their uncertainty for the forcing of hydrological models?

-what advances have we made in dealing with uncertainty associated in study of Impact of changing climate and land use on hydrology and how useful are they to decision makers?

Please feel free to forward this invitation to anyone who might be interested in this session.

Last date of Abstract Submission is 12th February 2019.

Warm Regards,

Convenors


http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2019/public.asp?page=funding.htm

12
Dear Colleagues,


You are cordially invited to submit an abstract to our AOGS 2019, 16th Annual Meeting (28th July to 2nd August 2019 in Singapore) session on

" Hydrologic Extremes in a Changing Climate" 


 Session Details (HS10): http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2019/public.asp?page=sessionList.htm

The goal of this session is to contribute to the discussions on the consequences of climate change and its impact on  hydrological  extremes. In this session, studies addressing but not limited to the following questions are welcome:

i. Surface and Ground water management under climate change


ii. Variations in extreme hydrological events and possible attributing factors


iii. Present methodologies adopted, limitations and advances


iv. Stationarity/ Non-stationarity factors


v. Case studies on climate change impact assessment at local/ basin/ regional scales


vi. Flood and Drought analyses


vii. Streamflow assessment and Reservoir operation


viii. Future climate and hydrology


ix. Change in spatio-temporal pattern of precipitation


x. Adaptation and Mitigation strategies


xi. Policy making


xii. Remote sensing applications

Please feel free to forward this invitation to anyone who might be interested in this session.

Last date of Abstract Submission is 12th February 2019.


Warm Regards,

Convenors
image.png

http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2019/public.asp?page=funding.htm

13
FYI


Seminar:

Title: Towards a realistic simulation of boreal summer tropical rainfall climatology in state-of-the-art coupled models

Speaker: Pascal Terray
Laboratoire d'Océanographie et du Climat: Experimentation et approches numériques
Institut Pierre Simon Laplace
Université Pierre & Marie Curie
Paris, France

Date/Time: 3:30 PM, Thursday, 15 November 2018.

Venue: CAOS Seminar Hall

Abstract:
State-of-the-art global coupled models used in seasonal prediction systems and climate projections still have important deficiencies in representing the boreal summer tropical rainfall climatology. These errors include prominently a severe dry bias over all the Northern Hemisphere monsoon regions, excessive rainfall over the ocean and an unrealistic double Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) structure in the tropical Pacific. While these systematic errors can be partly reduced by increasing the horizontal atmospheric resolution of the models, they also illustrate our incomplete understanding of the key mechanisms controlling the position of the ITCZ during boreal summer.
Using a large collection of coupled models and dedicated coupled experiments, we show that these tropical rainfall errors are partly associated with insufficient surface thermal forcing and incorrect representation of the surface albedo over the Northern Hemisphere continents. Improving the parameterization of the land albedo in two global coupled models leads to a large reduction of these systematic errors and further demonstrates that the Northern Hemisphere subtropical deserts play a seminal role in these improvements through a heat low mechanism.



ALL ARE WELCOME


14
Announcements / Jeremy Grantham Lecture on Climate Change
« on: November 08, 2018, 10:40:43 AM »
FYI

Prof. David Battisi, University of Washington, Seattle,USA will deliver the 14th Jeremy Grantham lecture on

Why is there an ocean overturning circulation in the North Atlantic and not in the North Pacific?
8 Nov  (Thursday) CAOS seminar hall 3.30 pm Tea at 3.15 pm


"Climate Change and Global Food Production"
on Friday 9th Nov at 3.30 pm in Divecha auditorium.



15
FYI

Dear Sir/Madam,

As part of the SMART training and outreach activities of Space Applications Centre (SAC), ISRO, Ahmedabad,  four days training programme on ‘Satellite based Sounding of the Atmosphere: Techniques and Applications’ is planned during 27-30 November 2018 at SAC, Ahmedabad.

I hereby enclose the details of this training programme and the application form. Request you to forward the details to interested scientists/students working in your organisation.
 
Thanking you,

Warm regards,

V. Sathiyamoorthy
------------------------------------------
Dr. V. Sathiyamoorthy
Scientist-SG & Head
MRTD/MRG/EPSA
Space Applications Centre, Bopal Campus
Indian Space Research Organisation
BOPAL, Ahmedabad -380058
Email:sathya@sac.isro.gov.in
Phone: 079-26916112


Fax: 079-26916127

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